Identifying learning and training needs, designing and sourcing training and learning solutions, delivering and evaluating training

 Occupational / Role Profile:

L&D Practitioners are typically involved with identifying learning / training needs, designing / sourcing training and learning solutions, delivering and evaluating training, and working with stakeholder / business area managers. The role focus is often on the practical delivery of training. The L&D Practitioner will typically have expertise and competence in their specific field whether it be technical, vocational or behavioural (e.g. use of software, food preparation, working in teams). They link the learning within their area of responsibility to business objectives and performance, understanding the learning cycle and working by it. The role can be more specialist, with a focus on and requiring in-depth expertise in a specific area of L&D such as learning design, e-learning or digital / blended learning. Whichever of these is an area of focus; the L&D Practitioner is future focused, understands the business context / culture and has a good grounding across the whole training and learning cycles.

The L&D Practitioner role typically exists in a wide range of organisations including private, public and third sector. The L&D Practitioner role supports the learning and development (L&D) function to contribute to, and influence, improved performance in the workplace at an individual, team and organisation level. Typically, the role would work alongside colleagues who specialise in Human Resources (i.e. employee relations, reward, recruitment) often supported by an L&D Administrator (more junior role) and report to an L&D Business Partner / Consultant / Manager. L&D Practitioners often work with Subject Matter Experts in different parts of the business.

Requirements: Core Knowledge, Skills and Behaviours

 The L&D Practitioner will have an understanding of:

 Technical expertise

  • Foundation level theories and models that underpin effective adult learning and group behaviour. For example, training/learning cycle, group dynamics, continuing professional development, evaluation.
  • How different learning delivery channels – face-to-face, blended or digital – contribute to effective learning.
  • How to measure the impact of a learning intervention on delegates, eg L1/L2 Kirkpatrick, improvement in skills.
  • The latest learning practice.
  • How diversity and inclusion influences the planning and delivery of L&D interventions.

   Business and Commercial understanding

  •  What their organisation does, its structure, values and its external market and sector.
  • The commercial context and drivers and process behind learning needs and solutions.
  • The various L&D roles that may be required for effective learning and development in an organisation.
  • Their roles and responsibilities within the L&D structure.
  • The policies and processes required for effective organisation learning.

 Management information and technology

  •  The role of data to analyse learning needs and ensure effective delivery.
  • How internal information systems can support learning.
  • How technology supports learning, including understanding of digital platforms / delivery channels as relevant.

 Skills

 The L&D Practitioner will be able to:

 Identification of training/ learning needs

  • Identify and analyse learning needs: establish team and individual capability and learning gaps, in line with organisational performance outcomes and to enable effective evaluation.
  • Use sound questioning and active listening skills to understand requirements and establish root causes i.e. establishing that it really is a learning/training need, before developing L&D solutions.
  • Consult with stakeholders to draw out relevant information and provide feedback to inform learning and training needs requirements.
  • Use effective analytical skills to seek out and analyse information.
  • Take ownership through to resolution, escalating complex situations as appropriate.

 Training / Learning Design

 Design, construct and structure training / learning resources to meet a variety of needs, which will include:

  • Research of delivery options and resources including digital / online / blended solutions (including identifying existing resources)
  • Planning programmes / sessions / modules
  • Selecting appropriate delivery methods
  • Designing creative, engaging, appropriate, and inclusive learning activities (could be e-learning, digital collaboration, group sessions, blended etc.)
  • Developing materials and resources to support learning.

Duration

18 months (this does not include EPA period)

Delivery

The delivery will be done mainly at the workplace, with the off-the-job training accounting for at least 6 hours a week. The assessor will regularly visit you at work to observe you performing relevant tasks and to carry out professional discussions.

You will complete Level 3 Learning and Development Practitioner prior to taking the end-point assessment.

Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the end-point assessment.

You will receive a login to an on-line portfolio account which can be accessed from any Wifi point or through 3/4G either at work, at home or in our centre. You will be provided with a detailed course programme. At the centre you will have the opportunity to network with other learners, share practice and access different resources to support your learning including laptops, desktops, tablets and textbooks.

Upon completion you can progress onto an advanced or higher apprenticeship at level 3, 4 or 5.

End Point Assessment

The end-point assessment (EPA) for the Learning and Development Apprenticeship contains 2 methods of assessment which will be graded as Fail, Pass or Distinction:

  • Work Based Project with Professional Discussion
  • Presentation based on the Learning Journal

 

Candidates for this course should be working in a related sector.

All applications will be reviewed on an individual basis. If you have experience or previous knowledge that will support your application please remember to include it. Apprentices without level 2 English and maths will need to achieve this level prior to taking the End-Point Assessment.

As an employer that doesn’t pay the apprenticeship levy, you pay just 5% towards the cost of training and assessing an apprentice.

The government will pay the rest up to the funding band maximum.

You’ll pay the training provider directly and agree on a payment schedule.

If you employ fewer than 50 employees, the government will pay 100% of the apprenticeship training costs up to the funding band maximum for apprentices aged:

  • 16 to 18
  • 19 to 24 with an education, health and care plan provided by their local authority or has been in the care of their local authority

Paying employer National Insurance contributions
Employers may not need to pay Class 1 National Insurance contributions for an apprentice, if the apprentice is:

  • under 25 years old
  • on an approved UK government apprenticeship standard or framework (these can differ depending on country)
  • earns less than £967 a week (£50,270 a year)

The apprentice, as an employee, will continue to pay Class 1 insurance contributions through their salary, this will only benefit the employer.

Read HMRC’s guidance on paying National Insurance contributions.